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Are You a Good Poker Player?

Are you a good Poker player?

If, on being presented to you in person, this discourse should promptly proceed to quiz you about yourself, the chances are you would tell, politely or facetiously or indignantly.

And you would be justified in resenting the breach of your privacy.

But here, you can answer to yourself. No revenue agent will hear you and start asking follow-up questions; no friend will hear you and start needling.

This exposition's job is to help you win money at Poker, so please be frank, because you have nobody to kid but yourself.

At Poker, do you: Win most of the time? Just about break even? Lose most of the time? Why?

If a Poker expert could hear your answer to the fist question, he would be willing to bet--- to give you nine to one odds--- on his ability to predict your answer to the second.

Clairvoyance, perhaps? No, just being statistical. Over the years, every Poker Player has heard from hundreds of other Poker players, too. All types in all classes.

Some have kept records--- explanations of their performance. Accordingly, one would think he knew what explanation to expect from you, after you have told how you fare.

Now let's see if you are being truthful to yourself.

If you answered, truthfully, that you win most of the time, you probably attribute the phenomenon to your skill; otherwise you are too modest.

After hauling in pot after pot over the course of a session, you may say, 'I was lucky,' but you won't mean it.

You may say it because you feel embarrassed taking all that loot from your friends, although you have earned it by outplaying them.

Or the rascal in you may be emerging: you may want to shore up their hopes so that they will return next week to give you more chips.

If you admitted that you lose most of the time, it is virtually certain that you are convinced your luck is bad, and the cards are to blame.

For the most part of such case is that, if you usually pay out at Poker, the reason is that you continually invite what you call your bad luck, and by your actions compel it to stay with you.

You can make your cards love you. You can win most of the time by applying always certain simple strategic and tactical principles, about which most players, including the veterans, know next to nothing.

To prove this, say you wee invited to a seven-hand game--- to sit in with other players, each of them typical of millions the nation over.

One is an expert. Two are better than average. Two are below average (and the national average is pitiable). One is completely inept. Later, still, another below-average player will sit in.

So, if with valid reason you hold your brand of Poker in high esteem, you will be getting all the better of it here, at the same time encountering enough competent opposition to test you.

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